Importing Quicken 16 files.

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Importing Quicken 16 files.

Burnell West
I have just registered on this list, having downloaded the MACOS version of gnuCash intending to import my two decades of transactions recorded in continuously upgraded versions of Quicken.

I am unsure what to do next.

The obvious thing (simply installing the app) seems to me problematic as it refers to files of type QIF as the install mode, and apparently Quicken 2016 does not use QIF files for backup.

The backup file suffix is “.quicken2016backup”, which opened in emacs provides the information that it is a directory with multiple subfiles/directories.

The only export files Q-16 provides are QMTF, QXF, and register transactions in CSV format.

QXF would be easy to code to, I suppose, as it’s in XML format. But it’s not QIF.

  — Burnie
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

Derek Atkins-3
Hi.
The OFX importer should be able to handle QFX, but I don't know if it will handle a full dump.  You may need to export one account at a time.

-derek

Sent from my mobile device. Please excuse any typos.

----- Reply message -----
From: "Burnell West" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Subject: Importing Quicken 16 files.
Date: Wed, Dec 21, 2016 6:13 PM

I have just registered on this list, having downloaded the MACOS version of gnuCash intending to import my two decades of transactions recorded in continuously upgraded versions of Quicken.

I am unsure what to do next.

The obvious thing (simply installing the app) seems to me problematic as it refers to files of type QIF as the install mode, and apparently Quicken 2016 does not use QIF files for backup.

The backup file suffix is “.quicken2016backup”, which opened in emacs provides the information that it is a directory with multiple subfiles/directories.

The only export files Q-16 provides are QMTF, QXF, and register transactions in CSV format.

QXF would be easy to code to, I suppose, as it’s in XML format. But it’s not QIF.

— Burnie
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

randix
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Burnell West
I'm certainly not here to diminish your enthusiasm... many years ago (how time passes), I opted to transfer over to GnuCash from Quicken (long have forgotten what version).  After various tries at importing the data, and finding I was spending too much time trying to "clean it up", etc., I decided:

1. Not to try and transfer my entire history of Quicken, but rather focus on the last year

2. Manually enter the last year of data into GnuCash, using the measure of a six pack of beer for every month of data

Can't say it wasn't a lot of fun, but the beer made it bearable, and all the data got entered exactly as it was in Quicken with no further clean-up.

...a classic, fyi and fwiw

PS  I have no regrets whatsoever about leaving Quicken and using GnuCash instead; although if my particular accounts could not be updated by GnuCash, I would have been very unhappy and quite frankly, probably would have looked at alternatives--as it is, I use Charles Schwab and Chase, and both work perfectly with GnuCash, enabling me to download those transactions, reconcile, etc.
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

Fross, Michael
Hello,

I recently switched from Quicken 2015.  I first setup my GC accounts.  I
exported each account from quicken and imported them with the GC QIF import
wizard.  It took some time as I went through the import screen and made
sure everything was mapping correctly from the quicken categories to the
correct new GC account.  If you take the time it helps on other accounts as
GC remembers the mapping.

I then took some time to go through everything and make sure that
everything is OK.  There were quite a few transactions that needed updated
accounts.  I do wish GC had a way to make changes in bulk.  For example,
search for a Payee and then change all of the transactions to a new
account.  It wasn't too bad with being able to paste in the new account,
but this is certainly an area that can be improved.  However, it's probably
not that important once you get everything where you want it and start to
use it on a daily basis.

When I was sure it was right, then I updated the opening balance so that it
matched quicken and I was set.

I won't lie...it took a few hours (3-4) to go through all of this.
However, now everything is perfect and I'm loving GnuCash.

Lastly, I do agree with Steve.  Pull in a year, but don't try to pull in
everything.  You probably don't need it and can always open up quicken if
you need to look back longer than a year.

Good luck.

Michael

On Wed, Dec 21, 2016 at 7:25 PM, Steve <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm certainly not here to diminish your enthusiasm... many years ago (how
> time passes), I opted to transfer over to GnuCash from Quicken (long have
> forgotten what version).  After various tries at importing the data, and
> finding I was spending too much time trying to "clean it up", etc., I
> decided:
>
> 1. Not to try and transfer my entire history of Quicken, but rather focus
> on
> the last year
>
> 2. Manually enter the last year of data into GnuCash, using the measure of
> a
> six pack of beer for every month of data
>
> Can't say it wasn't a lot of fun, but the beer made it bearable, and all
> the
> data got entered exactly as it was in Quicken with no further clean-up.
>
> ...a classic, fyi and fwiw
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://gnucash.1415818.n4.
> nabble.com/Importing-Quicken-16-files-tp4688368p4688370.html
> Sent from the GnuCash - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
> _______________________________________________
> gnucash-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnucash.org/mailman/listinfo/gnucash-user
> -----
> Please remember to CC this list on all your replies.
> You can do this by using Reply-To-List or Reply-All.
>
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

GnuCash - User mailing list
In reply to this post by randix
… and my experience (also many years ago) was that I was able to import the entire file (including account structure and transactions) in one huge import. There were, I admit, numerous areas that needed cleanup, but as my Quicken file was pretty clean, that cleanup was relatively painless. The adjustment from Quicken to GnuCash was a little rockier (as old timers on the list might recall…).

I certainly understand that others have had difficult file transitions, and support Steve’s approach as valid, but I wanted to offer an alternative perspective.

David

P.S. If I were to drink a six-pack for every moth processed, I imagine my data entry accuracy would slide precipitously.

> On Dec 22, 2016, at 6:25 AM, Steve <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I'm certainly not here to diminish your enthusiasm... many years ago (how
> time passes), I opted to transfer over to GnuCash from Quicken (long have
> forgotten what version).  After various tries at importing the data, and
> finding I was spending too much time trying to "clean it up", etc., I
> decided:
>
> 1. Not to try and transfer my entire history of Quicken, but rather focus on
> the last year
>
> 2. Manually enter the last year of data into GnuCash, using the measure of a
> six pack of beer for every month of data
>
> Can't say it wasn't a lot of fun, but the beer made it bearable, and all the
> data got entered exactly as it was in Quicken with no further clean-up.
>
> ...a classic, fyi and fwiw
>
>
>
> --
> View this message in context: http://gnucash.1415818.n4.nabble.com/Importing-Quicken-16-files-tp4688368p4688370.html
> Sent from the GnuCash - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
> _______________________________________________
> gnucash-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.gnucash.org/mailman/listinfo/gnucash-user
> -----
> Please remember to CC this list on all your replies.
> You can do this by using Reply-To-List or Reply-All.


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Liz
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

Liz
On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 11:15:17 +0500
"David T. via gnucash-user" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> … and my experience (also many years ago) was that I was able to
> import the entire file (including account structure and transactions)
> in one huge import. There were, I admit, numerous areas that needed
> cleanup, but as my Quicken file was pretty clean, that cleanup was
> relatively painless. The adjustment from Quicken to GnuCash was a
> little rockier (as old timers on the list might recall…).
>
> I certainly understand that others have had difficult file
> transitions, and support Steve’s approach as valid, but I wanted to
> offer an alternative perspective.
>
> David
>
> P.S. If I were to drink a six-pack for every moth processed, I
> imagine my data entry accuracy would slide precipitously.


I did an import, so many years ago I don't recall.
My problem was the data entry I started with was poor. It didn't
convert well to double-entry, particularly my GST records, which took
years to straighten out.
No beer was consumed on initial entry, import or fixing up!

Liz

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Liz
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

Liz
In reply to this post by GnuCash - User mailing list
On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 11:15:17 +0500
"David T. via gnucash-user" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> … and my experience (also many years ago) was that I was able to
> import the entire file (including account structure and transactions)
> in one huge import. There were, I admit, numerous areas that needed
> cleanup, but as my Quicken file was pretty clean, that cleanup was
> relatively painless. The adjustment from Quicken to GnuCash was a
> little rockier (as old timers on the list might recall…).
>
> I certainly understand that others have had difficult file
> transitions, and support Steve’s approach as valid, but I wanted to
> offer an alternative perspective.
>
> David
>
> P.S. If I were to drink a six-pack for every moth processed, I
> imagine my data entry accuracy would slide precipitously.


I did an import, so many years ago I don't recall.
My problem was the data entry I started with was poor. It didn't
convert well to double-entry, particularly my GST records, which took
years to straighten out.
No beer was consumed on initial entry, import or fixing up!

Liz

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Liz
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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

Liz
In reply to this post by GnuCash - User mailing list
On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 11:15:17 +0500
"David T. via gnucash-user" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> … and my experience (also many years ago) was that I was able to
> import the entire file (including account structure and transactions)
> in one huge import. There were, I admit, numerous areas that needed
> cleanup, but as my Quicken file was pretty clean, that cleanup was
> relatively painless. The adjustment from Quicken to GnuCash was a
> little rockier (as old timers on the list might recall…).
>
> I certainly understand that others have had difficult file
> transitions, and support Steve’s approach as valid, but I wanted to
> offer an alternative perspective.
>
> David
>
> P.S. If I were to drink a six-pack for every moth processed, I
> imagine my data entry accuracy would slide precipitously.


I did an import, so many years ago I don't recall.
My problem was the data entry I started with was poor. It didn't
convert well to double-entry, particularly my GST records, which took
years to straighten out.
No beer was consumed on initial entry, import or fixing up!

Liz

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Re: Importing Quicken 16 files.

Burnell West
Thanks to all who responded so quickly.
To those who imported a long time ago, quicken used QIF until a couple of years ago;
I had actually converted to gnu cash about 12 years ago, but it didn’t work so well for me
at that time.

I’ll try some things and be back soon.

> On Dec 22, 2016, at 2:13 AM, Liz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On Thu, 22 Dec 2016 11:15:17 +0500
> "David T. via gnucash-user" <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>> … and my experience (also many years ago) was that I was able to
>> import the entire file (including account structure and transactions)
>> in one huge import. There were, I admit, numerous areas that needed
>> cleanup, but as my Quicken file was pretty clean, that cleanup was
>> relatively painless. The adjustment from Quicken to GnuCash was a
>> little rockier (as old timers on the list might recall…).
>>
>> I certainly understand that others have had difficult file
>> transitions, and support Steve’s approach as valid, but I wanted to
>> offer an alternative perspective.
>>
>> David
>>
>> P.S. If I were to drink a six-pack for every moth processed, I
>> imagine my data entry accuracy would slide precipitously.
>
>
> I did an import, so many years ago I don't recall.
> My problem was the data entry I started with was poor. It didn't
> convert well to double-entry, particularly my GST records, which took
> years to straighten out.
> No beer was consumed on initial entry, import or fixing up!
>
> Liz
>
> _______________________________________________
> gnucash-user mailing list
> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
> https://lists.gnucash.org/mailman/listinfo/gnucash-user <https://lists.gnucash.org/mailman/listinfo/gnucash-user>
> -----
> Please remember to CC this list on all your replies.
> You can do this by using Reply-To-List or Reply-All.

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