Getting started

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Getting started

Graham Jacks
I have been using Quicken for my finances for some years, but I want to change, and I like what I have read about Gnu Cash.  I’ve had enough experience with double-entry book-keeping systems to know what it means.

Would it be feasible to use my closing balances from Quicken, at, say,  Dec 31 2017 as the opening balances to start my Gnu Cash financials at Jan 1, 2018?

I plan to keep and be able to access my Quicken files for historical purposes (tax returns come to mind), but I was not planning to import them into my new Gnu Cash record.  

Is this what new users usually do?
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Re: Getting started

Buddha Buck
I don't know if it is what new users usually do, but I think it's probably
one of the better ways to do it. A lot of the difficulties I see on the
gnucash-users list come from trying to import data from other programs,
especially multi-year Quicken imports.

On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 6:52 PM Graham Jacks <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> I have been using Quicken for my finances for some years, but I want to
> change, and I like what I have read about Gnu Cash.  I’ve had enough
> experience with double-entry book-keeping systems to know what it means.
>
> Would it be feasible to use my closing balances from Quicken, at, say,
> Dec 31 2017 as the opening balances to start my Gnu Cash financials at Jan
> 1, 2018?
>
> I plan to keep and be able to access my Quicken files for historical
> purposes (tax returns come to mind), but I was not planning to import them
> into my new Gnu Cash record.
>
> Is this what new users usually do?
> _______________________________________________
> gnucash-user mailing list
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> To update your subscription preferences or to unsubscribe:
> https://lists.gnucash.org/mailman/listinfo/gnucash-user
> If you are using Nabble or Gmane, please see
> https://wiki.gnucash.org/wiki/Mailing_Lists for more information.
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Re: Getting started

N B Day
On Mon, 2018-02-05 at 00:05 +0000, Buddha Buck wrote:

> I don't know if it is what new users usually do, but I think it's
> probably
> one of the better ways to do it. A lot of the difficulties I see on
> the
> gnucash-users list come from trying to import data from other
> programs,
> especially multi-year Quicken imports.
>
> On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 6:52 PM Graham Jacks <[hidden email]
> t>
> wrote:
>
> > I have been using Quicken for my finances for some years, but I
> > want to
> > change, and I like what I have read about Gnu Cash.  I’ve had
> > enough
> > experience with double-entry book-keeping systems to know what it
> > means.
> >
> > Would it be feasible to use my closing balances from Quicken, at,
> > say,
> > Dec 31 2017 as the opening balances to start my Gnu Cash financials
> > at Jan
> > 1, 2018?
> >
> > I plan to keep and be able to access my Quicken files for
> > historical
> > purposes (tax returns come to mind), but I was not planning to
> > import them
> > into my new Gnu Cash record.
> >
What Budda Buck said.  When I converted to gnucash from that other
demands-an-annual-update software in 2008, I did what you propose and
also ran them in parallel for several months until I was comfortable
that I was getting things right in gnucash.  There is a bit of a
learning curve when transitioning but gnucash is so much better (and
free!) that it is more than worth the trouble imho.

We don't thank the developers nearly often enough for this wonderful
cross-platform software.

Good luck!


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Re: Getting started

Ronal B Morse-2


On 02/04/2018 05:45 PM, N B Day wrote:

> On Mon, 2018-02-05 at 00:05 +0000, Buddha Buck wrote:
>> I don't know if it is what new users usually do, but I think it's
>> probably
>> one of the better ways to do it. A lot of the difficulties I see on
>> the
>> gnucash-users list come from trying to import data from other
>> programs,
>> especially multi-year Quicken imports.
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 4, 2018 at 6:52 PM Graham Jacks <[hidden email]
>> t>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I have been using Quicken for my finances for some years, but I
>>> want to
>>> change, and I like what I have read about Gnu Cash.  I’ve had
>>> enough
>>> experience with double-entry book-keeping systems to know what it
>>> means.
>>>
>>> Would it be feasible to use my closing balances from Quicken, at,
>>> say,
>>> Dec 31 2017 as the opening balances to start my Gnu Cash financials
>>> at Jan
>>> 1, 2018?
>>>
>>> I plan to keep and be able to access my Quicken files for
>>> historical
>>> purposes (tax returns come to mind), but I was not planning to
>>> import them
>>> into my new Gnu Cash record.
>>>
> What Budda Buck said.  When I converted to gnucash from that other
> demands-an-annual-update software in 2008, I did what you propose and
> also ran them in parallel for several months until I was comfortable
> that I was getting things right in gnucash.  There is a bit of a
> learning curve when transitioning but gnucash is so much better (and
> free!) that it is more than worth the trouble imho.
>
> We don't thank the developers nearly often enough for this wonderful
> cross-platform software.
>
> Good luck!
>
>
Quicken (gak) has a good reports facility.  I spent some time going
through my Quicken data and printing to .pdf files stuff I thought I was
likely to need in the future (mostly tax related).   I can get to the
reports without having to boot Windows and start Quicken, although I
keep both intact just in case.

As others have mentioned, there's a learning curve to GnuCash, but I
found it very much worth the effort.

RBM
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